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The Art of Creating
New Medicines

Scientists are often lauded for their objectivity, persistence, and analytic thinking. But great scientists have something else in common: they think like artists. And for those who create life-changing medicines, their process is as much an art form as a science. 

Go Behind the Science
Your Health

Skipped Childhood Immunizations Could Lead to Resurgence of Vaccine-Preventable Diseases 

Childhood vaccination rates dropped drastically during the COVID-19 pandemic, and it could potentially mean a resurgence of diseases we've long had under control.

Skipped Childhood Immunizations Could Lead to Resurgence of Vaccine-Preventable Diseases 
Your Health

Addressing Disproportionate Childhood Vaccination

Vaccines for children should be available and accessible to all.

Addressing Disproportionate Childhood Vaccination
Science

How Does a Protease Inhibitor Work

The FDA has authorized Pfizer’s COVID-19 oral treatment for emergency use.

How Does a Protease Inhibitor Work

Are You Making the Most of Patient Centricity?

Healthcare opportunities are only useful to you if you know they exist and how they work. This downloadable eBook is designed to help you make informed healthcare decisions.

Learn How to Be an Empowered, Engaged Patient

Show Your Pfizer Pride! Shop and share the collection.
Available in the U.S. only.

All profits from The Pfizer Store will be donated to charity.

Shop The Pfizer Collection

While we continue to see the devastating impact of the coronavirus pandemic around the world, we’re committed to helping keep people safe and informed. 

More On COVID-19
Pfizer RxPathways connects eligible patients to a range of assistance programs that offer insurance support, co-pay help, and medicines for free or at a savings. 

 

Explore RxPathways

Starting with Charles Pfizer inventing an almond-flavored antiparasite medicine in 1849, our people have always been innovators and trailblazers, committed to finding the next cure. 

Learn More About Us

The medicines available today have taken an average of 12 years to develop. With dedication, creativity, and science, we can significantly cut that time.

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