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Type 2 diabetes is a chronic disease that occurs when a person’s body does not make or use insulin effectively to regulate blood sugar.1 Despite the availability of multiple classes of treatments, approximately half of people diagnosed with type 2 diabetes are not at their blood sugar goal.2 Harnessing our legacy and expertise in cardiovascular and metabolic diseases, Pfizer aims to identify and develop breakthrough treatments for people with type 2 diabetes.

For more information about our pipeline and clinical trials related to diabetes, visit this page.

  • Type 2 diabetes is a chronic disease and the most common form of diabetes. Type 2 diabetes occurs when a person’s body does not make or use insulin effectively to regulate blood sugar. Adults with diabetes are two to four times more likely to have cardiovascular disease than a person without diabetes.3

  • Approximately 9 percent of the global population has diabetes – including an estimated 34 million Americans – and 90-95 percent of these cases are type 2 diabetes.4,5 A person can develop type 2 diabetes at any age; however, it occurs most commonly in middle-aged and older people.6 There are many contributing factors that may lead to type 2 diabetes, including being overweight or physically inactive. Genes and family history can also be a risk factor for type 2 diabetes. Certain racial/ethnic groups are more likely to develop type 2 diabetes, including African Americans, Alaska Natives, American Indians, Asian Americans, Hispanics/Latinos, and Pacific Islanders.1,5

  • Type 2 diabetes symptoms include: frequent urination (often at night), excessive thirst, unintended weight loss, extreme hunger, blurry vision, numb or tingling hands or feet, fatigue, dry skin, having sores that heal slowly, or having more infections than usual.7

    Type 2 diabetes symptoms can develop over several years and may go unnoticed for a long time. In fact, it is estimated that 50 percent of people with type 2 diabetes are undiagnosed.4

  • Testing a person’s blood sugar can determine if someone has type 2 diabetes. There are several types of blood sugar tests, including an A1C test, which measures blood sugar levels over the past 2-3 months, a fasting blood sugar test, and a glucose tolerance test.9 An A1C of 6.5 percent or above, a fasting blood sugar level of 126 mg/dl or higher, or a glucose tolerance test of 200 mg/dl or higher indicates type 2 diabetes.9

  • While there is currently no cure for type 2 diabetes, losing weight, eating healthy foods, and being active can help prevent, delay, and manage diabetes.10,11 There are also several classes of medications to help people with type 2 diabetes control their blood sugar. It is important to understand the risk factors – which include being overweight, age 45 or older, or having a parent or sibling with type 2 diabetes – and to speak with a healthcare practitioner.8,10,11

Type 2 Diabetes is a focus of our Internal Medicine Therapeutic Area.

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We proudly partner with thousands of study sites and tens of thousands of trial participants around the world. It's these clinical trials that lead to life-changing medicines.

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1National Institutes of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. Type 2 Diabetes. https://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/diabetes/overview/what-is-diabetes/type-2-diabetes
2Blonde, Lawrence et al. Gaps and barriers in the control of blood glucose in people with type 2 diabetes. Diabetes & Vascular Disease Research. 2017; 14,3:172-183. doi:10.1177/1479164116679775
3John Hopkins Medicine. Diabetes and Heart Disease. https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/health/conditions-and-diseases/diabetes/diabetes-and-heart-disease.
4Saeedi, Pouya et al. Global and regional diabetes prevalence estimates for 2019 and projections for 2030 and 2045: Results from the International Diabetes Federation Diabetes Atlas, 9th edition. Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice. 2019;157:1-10. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.diabres.2019.107843
5Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Diabetes Quick Facts. https://www.cdc.gov/diabetes/basics/quick-facts.html
6National Institutes of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. What is Diabetes?. https://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/diabetes/overview/what-is-diabetes
7Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Diabetes Symptoms. https://www.cdc.gov/diabetes/basics/symptoms.html
8Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Diabetes Risk Factors. https://www.cdc.gov/diabetes/basics/risk-factors.html
9Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Diabetes Tests. https://www.cdc.gov/diabetes/basics/getting-tested.html
10National Institutes of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. Your Game Plan to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes. https://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/diabetes/overview/preventing-type-2-diabetes/game-plan
11National Institutes of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. Managing Diabetes. https://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/diabetes/overview/managing-diabetes